Civil War Soldiers in the WW I US Army

Civil War Campaign Medal, Peter C. Hains, Charles King, WW I Victory Medal

These two reliable, old smoothbores were officers of the Regular Army but not serving on active duty in 1917. Both were recalled and served their country when the United States entered the war. 

Peter C. Hains (1840-1921) graduated from West Point in 1861 in the Engineers. and was brevetted three time during the war. He served on engineer projects after the war, notably the Lighthouse Service, as District Engineer at Washington and on the Panama Canal Commission. During the War with Spain he served as a Brigadier General of Volunteers and retired in 1904 as  a Brigadier General, USA. He was recalled in 1917  to serve as Division Engineer in Washington DC  to allow  a younger officer to do duty in Europe. He was the oldest US soldier in uniform during WW I and served about 45 years. 

Charles King (1844-1933) served in the US Army from 1861-1862. He entered West Point in 1862 and graduated as an artillery officer in 1866. In 1870 he transferred to the cavalry and served in that arm until he was severely wounded in action. He was retired for disability in 1879 and began a long service with the Wisconsin National Guard. He served during the Spanish War and commanded a brigade during the Philipine Insurrection. He was recalled for active service during WW I, training troops. In 1932 he was  credited with 70 years of  service. He is shown wearing the Civil War and Indian War Campaign Medal (with Silver Gallantry Star) , The Puerto Rico Occupation Medal, The Philipine Campaign Medal and the WW I Victory Medal.  

King was a novelist of some note in the 19th century. His many novels, based on his experiences in the West earned him the reputation as “the American Rudyard Kipling.”

Major James B. Ronan II is a Fellow of the Company of Military Historians http://www.military-historians.org/

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